French Partitive Articles

French partitive articles are used to express quantities that are not specified or measurable. These articles are essential when talking about portions of something rather than the whole.

 

Forms of Partitive Articles

French partitive articles vary based on gender and number. The main forms are:

  • du: used with masculine singular nouns
  • de la: used with feminine singular nouns
  • de l’: used with singular nouns starting with a vowel or silent ‘h’
  • des: used with plural nouns

You can read more about French nouns here.

 

Using Partitive Articles

Partitive articles are typically used when referring to food, drinks, and other materials that can be divided into portions. Here are examples of each form:

  • du pain: some bread
  • de la viande: some meat
  • de l’eau: some water
  • des fruits: some fruits

 

Negation and Partitive Articles

When making a negative statement, partitive articles change to de or d’ regardless of gender or number. Examples include:

  • Je n’ai pas de pain: I don’t have any bread.
  • Elle ne veut pas de viande: She doesn’t want any meat.
  • Il n’y a pas **d’**eau: There isn’t any water.
  • Nous n’avons pas de fruits: We don’t have any fruits.

 

Partitive Articles with Expressions of Quantity

Certain expressions of quantity, such as “beaucoup,” “un peu,” and “assez,” also influence the use of partitive articles. In these cases, the partitive articles usually change to de or d’:

  • beaucoup de pain: a lot of bread
  • un peu de viande: a little meat
  • assez d’ eau: enough water

 

Special Cases

There are special cases where partitive articles are not used:

  • With specific quantities: une tranche de pain (a slice of bread)
  • When using the verb “aimer” in a general sense: J’aime le pain (I like bread)
  • With certain expressions: avoir besoin de (to need), manquer de (to lack)

 

Differences Between Partitive and Definite Articles

While partitive articles refer to unspecified quantities, definite articles (le, la, l’, les) are used when referring to specific items or the whole of something:

  • Partitive: Je veux du fromage (I want some cheese)
  • Definite: Je veux le fromage qui est dans le frigo (I want the cheese that is in the fridge)

By understanding and using French partitive articles correctly, speakers can more accurately convey meaning related to quantities and portions.

 

Exercises with French Partitive Articles

Practice using French partitive articles with the following exercises. Fill in the blanks with the correct partitive article: du, de la, de l’, or des.


Exercise 1

  1. Je voudrais ___ lait.
  2. Il y a ___ beurre sur la table.
  3. Nous mangeons ___ pain chaque matin.
  4. Elle a acheté ___ légumes au marché.
  5. Tu veux ___ eau?

Click to see the answers

Answers:

  1. Je voudrais du lait.
  2. Il y a du beurre sur la table.
  3. Nous mangeons du pain chaque matin.
  4. Elle a acheté des légumes au marché.
  5. Tu veux de l’ eau?

Exercise 2

  1. Ils ont besoin ___ farine pour la recette.
  2. Vous avez ___ chocolat?
  3. On boit souvent ___ café après le dîner.
  4. Elle met ___ sucre dans son thé.
  5. Nous avons pris ___ frites avec notre repas.

Click to see the answers

Answers:

  1. Ils ont besoin de la farine pour la recette.
  2. Vous avez du chocolat?
  3. On boit souvent du café après le dîner.
  4. Elle met du sucre dans son thé.
  5. Nous avons pris des frites avec notre repas.

Exercise 3

  1. Il n’y a pas ___ fromage dans le frigo.
  2. Elle ne boit jamais ___ jus d’orange.
  3. Je n’ai pas ___ fruits à la maison.
  4. Ils ne veulent pas ___ viande pour le déjeuner.
  5. Nous n’achetons pas ___ produits laitiers.

Click to see the answers

Answers:

  1. Il n’y a pas de fromage dans le frigo.
  2. Elle ne boit jamais de jus d’orange.
  3. Je n’ai pas de fruits à la maison.
  4. Ils ne veulent pas de viande pour le déjeuner.
  5. Nous n’achetons pas de produits laitiers.