Les subordonnées en allemand : Relatives, temporelles et causales

German subordinate clauses play a crucial role in constructing complex sentences, providing additional information, and indicating relationships between different parts of a sentence. Among these, relative, temporal, and causal clauses are prominent. Let’s look into each of these types with examples.

 

Relative Clauses

Relative clauses in German provide additional information about a noun or pronoun in the main clause. They are introduced by relative pronouns such as “der”, “die”, “das”, “welcher”, “welche”, “welches”, and others. Here’s an example:

  • Das Buch, das ich lese, ist sehr interessant. (The book that I’m reading is very interesting.)

Dans cet exemple, “das ich lese” is the relative clause providing additional information about “das Buch”.

 

Temporal Clauses

Temporal clauses in German indicate time relationships and are introduced by subordinating conjunctions such as “wenn” (quand), “bevor” (before), “nachdem” (after), and others. Here’s an example:

  • Wenn es regnet, bleibe ich zu Hause. (When it rains, I stay at home.)

Ici, “wenn es regnet” functions as a temporal clause indicating the condition under which the main clause occurs.

 

Causal Clauses

Causal clauses in German express the cause or reason for the action in the main clause. They are introduced by subordinating conjunctions such as “weil” (because), “da” (since), “denn” (for), among others. Here’s an example:

  • Ich gehe nicht ins Kino, weil ich müde bin. (I’m not going to the cinema because I’m tired.)

Dans cette phrase, “weil ich müde bin” serves as a causal clause explaining the reason for not going to the cinema.