Saksan ja englannin kieliopin vertailu: keskeiset erot ja yhtäläisyydet

German and English are both Indo-European languages, but they exhibit distinct grammatical structures. In this article, we’ll look into the key differences and similarities between German and English grammar.

 

Sanajärjestys

Saksan

  • In German, the basic word order is Subject-Verb-Object (SVO), similar to English.
  • However, German is more flexible with word order due to its case system. This means that word order can change without altering the meaning of the sentence.

Englanti

  • English also follows the Subject-Verb-Object (SVO) word order in most cases.
  • Unlike German, English has less flexibility in word order, and changing it can often change the meaning of the sentence.

 

Cases

Saksan

  • German has four cases: nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive.
  • The case of a noun determines its function in the sentence and affects the articles, adjectives, and pronouns associated with it.

Englanti

  • English used to have a more extensive case system, but it has largely disappeared. However, some remnants remain, such as pronoun cases (e.g., I/me, he/him, she/her).
  • English mainly relies on word order and prepositions to indicate the relationship between words in a sentence.

 

Articles

Saksan

  • German articles (definite and indefinite) change depending on the gender, number, and case of the noun they accompany.
  • There are three definite articles in German: “der” (masculine), “die” (feminine), and “das” (neuter).

Englanti

  • English articles (a/an and the) do not change based on gender, number, or case.
  • English has only one definite article (“the”) and two indefinite articles (“a” ja “an”).

 

Verbin taivutus

Saksan

  • German verbs conjugate based on person and number (I am, you are, he/she/it is).
  • German has strong and weak verbs, and irregular verbs are common.

Englanti

  • English verbs conjugate for tense and person (I am, you are, he/she/it is).
  • English has fewer verb conjugations compared to German, and irregular verbs are also present but less common.